Burning questions remain about Dublin’s ‘Waste-To-Energy’ incinerator

 

Dublin Waste to Energy [Pic Credit Blathnaid Mc Polin]

The Covanta Dublin Waste to Energy plant is now operating at full capacity, but questions remain around the safety and potential public health impact of the plant.

I visited the plant on 15th March 2018 to put these questions to its General Manager, John Daly, and to take a close up look at the technology that is required to incinerate 600,000 tonnes of black bin waste.

Listen below to the piece broadcast on Drivetime on 26th March 2018.

 

 

Money can buy happiness; stem cell patch to heal hearts; why exhibit animals in zoos?; prosthetic hands now feel real

The Zoo
Is keeping animals in Zoos morally justifiable? [source: Paignton Zoo]

Broadcast on The Morning Show at East Coast FM – 15th March 2018

Featured stories:

Money CAN buy you happiness, scientists say http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5493825/Science-says-buy-happiness-does-cost.htm

Stem cell patch to heal hearts damaged by cardiac arrest https://futurism.com/stem-cell-patch-heal-hearts-damaged-cardiac-arrest/

Why do we continue to exhibit animals in zoos https://www.irishtimes.com/news/science/why-do-we-continue-to-exhibit-animals-in-zoos-1.3376662

Prosthetic hands feel more real thanks to ‘good vibrations’ http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/03/prosthetic-hands-feel-more-real-thanks-some-good-vibrations

 

 

TCD scientists devise tool to predict impact of warming on parasitic disease.

Lyme Disease
TCD scientists have devised a method to predict the impact of global warming on parasitic diseases such as Lyme disease, which is caused by a tick. [Source: http://www.Macleans.ca]

The prediction of which infectious diseases will worsen and which will diminish with rising temperatures is now possible thanks to scientists at TCD.

The method can, the scientists say, identify which infectious diseases will have worsened or diminished effects with rising temperatures.

“Rising temperatures due to global warming can alter the proliferation and severity of infectious diseases, and this has broad implications for conservation and food security,” said Professor Pepin Luijckx, who led the study with William C Campbell, lecturer in parasite biology at TCD and graduate student Devin Kirk.

“It is therefore really important that we understand and identify the diseases that will become more harmful with rising temperatures, with a view to mitigating their impacts,” Prof Luijckx added.

Scientists have found it difficult to pinpoint the the precise  impact  rising temperature will have on the host and pathogen, and on disease, because temperature can affect these in different ways.

For example, while host immune function and pathogen infectivity may be higher as temperatures rise, pathogen longevity may be lower.   Additionally, to predict the severity of disease, scientists need data that doesn’t always exist on the temperature sensitivity of all the processes involved, especially for newly emergent diseases.

Solution 

The solution, the TCD scientists say, is that the so-called metabolic theory of ecology can be used to predict how various biological processes respond to temperature.    This theory is based on the idea that each process is controlled by enzymes, and that the activity and temperature dependence of these enzymes can be described using simple equations.

Even with limited data, the theory thus allows for the prediction of the temperature dependence of host and pathogen processes.

In their study, the scientists used the water flea and its pathogen and measured how processes such as host mortality, aging, parasite growth and damage done to the host changed over a wide temperature range. They used these measurements to determine the thermal dependencies of each of these processes using metabolic theory.

The results showed that the different processes had unique relationships with temperature. For example, while damage inflicted to the host per pathogen appeared to be independent of temperature, both host mortality and pathogen growth rate were strongly dependent — but in opposite ways.

“What is exciting is that these results demonstrate that linking and integrating metabolic theory within a mathematical model of host-pathogen interactions is effective in describing how and why disease interactions change with global warming,” Prof Luijckx said.

“Due to its simplicity and generality, the method we have developed could be widely applied to understand the likely impact of global warming on a variety of diseases, including diseases affecting aquaculture, such as salmonid diseases like Pancreas disease, pathogens of bee pollinators, such as Nosema, and growth of vector-borne and tick-borne diseases in their invertebrate hosts, such as malaria and Lyme disease,” the Prof concluded.

The world is getting better, not worse, thanks to Enlightenment values – Stephen Pinker

Harvard University Professor Stephen Pinker, pictured above, argues the things are getting steadily better in the world

The above piece was broadcast on Drivetime, RTE Radio 1, on 19th February ’18

 

The election of Donald Trump, looming Brexit and the ominous re-awakening of fascism across Europe are just some of the reasons why many people today might think that things are getting worse, as we struggle to cope with an unstable world.

However, Stephen Pinker, the celebrated Prof of Psychology at Harvard University, argues in his new book ‘Enlightenment Now – The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress’ (Penguin Random House, 2018) that, despite all the pessimism, things are getting better.

This is due to the ongoing, and spreading influence of Enlightenment ideas around the world, the author argues, while presenting data, charts and graphs to support his optimistic position.

Prof Pinker’s is giving a talk at TCD on Friday 23rd, February

brain ‘pacemaker’ for Alzheimer’s; attractive people more right wing; friends on the same wavelength

Attractive People
Attractive people tend to be more right wing in their political views researchers have found

Listen below to piece broadcast on East Coast FM on 1st Feb 2018

The Mayo woman aiming to be first Irish astronaut in space

Norah Patten, from Ballina, has dreamed of travelling into space since she was in primary school [Credit: http://www.planetzebunar]
Listen below to the interview piece for Drivetime on RTE Radio 1, broadcast on 8/01/’18